Slider

Pete Hautman

Slider is a witty story of a teen who loves to eat and he’s good at it too. 14-year-old David checks stats on all his favourite food competitors and their competitions. He finds out a half-eaten hot dog, eaten by one of his idols, is being sold online but he needs a credit card to purchase it. Through “borrowing” a credit card and setting up an automated bidding system he ends up the not so proud owner of a preserved old hot dog.

He has many bouts of bad luck throughout the plot and slowly gets into debt with his friends. He begins to train in eating and attempts competitions himself with slider burgers, pizza, and many other foods. David struggles to make plans to get the money back, some more realistic than others. All the same, no matter the quality of his plan he vows to earn the money back or his life will be ruined by spending so much. Food competitions aren’t always as they seem: there are rule changes, sabotage and sometimes the prize isn’t what you had expected. Making friends in some of his competitions at some points help him to up his ante and find new and gross food eating techniques.

David is also assigned to take care of his brother Mal who has autism and only speaks one word, “okay”. Mal doesn’t talk much or eat a variety but his feats in learning help push David for his brother’s sake. Things may not always be right but are sometimes the right things to do; this is a lesson David learns through experience and later presents closer to the end of the story.

Overall, Slider is a hilarious read that will make you laugh out loud and maybe look at burgers a little differently. It is a must-read for those who love comedy and are looking for a fun light read. – Zoe P.

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The Infinite Moment of Us

Lauren Myracle

A true love story of being broken and finding yourself. Even when you try to run away from your life, you are always brought back to reality. The Infinite Moment of Us tells the story from alternating perspectives of Wren, who has never made decisions for herself, and Charlie, who has lived a tough past. They find each other when they are both lost, and though they may lose each other along the way, they will but always know where home is.

The story is about love, and home, with wonderful writing. It is a coming of age novel of innocence and taking a leap of faith to find yourself even if everything might not go as once planned. The two grew up in different ways with different types of parents — some overprotective and others not caring at all. The characters have morals and things they do on instinct; romance laced with jealousy and the fact of feeling broken. Also, when Wren starts to make decisions for herself and rebels against any rules, her parents are distraught.

One part I disliked was that a bunch of the book was graphical in the its descriptions, so it is for older mature teen audiences. I would recommend for those who like the genre. If you overlook that, the story plot was better than most romance novels, which focus mostly on the drama factor. The setting and places this book tells about are unknown to the reader as the author never describes it and when she does it is very vague. A fast read, however, it is an intense love story and not a book for everyone. Overall a good book, and I wish it had a sequel or something to continue the story. – Zoe P.

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Six Impossible Things

Fiona Wood

Six Impossible Things was a hilarious book that made you laugh at the situations Dan experiences — like a company bankruptcy and a divorce lead to a move into a deceased family members’ home. These life-altering changes lead to the discovery of an attic connecting his house to the house of the girl next door, but not just any girl — a girl he’s been watching and admiring. Although they have never met, he knows more about her than he should. She’s even number 1 on his list of six impossible things list! Nothing can go right for Dan; no matter how much he worries and plans, there always seems to be a little blip, something changes, or he gets caught.

Not at all overly dramatized like many other teen novels, which make for a better plot. I would recommend this book for people who have enjoyed My Life Next Door by Huntley Fitzpatrick. I wish Six Impossible Things would have had a more detailed and emotional ending compared to the abrupt ending that it had, but it was still a great book and overall enjoyable. No matter how many times the others at school tried to put him down, he would get back up only slightly fazed and continue to try. Dan doesn’t give up, and although the list is of Impossible things he refuses to stop trying to obtain his goals and complete the list, Dan doesn’t give up trying to achieve his six impossible things. This book teaches a very good lesson that sometimes we forget, that what you want may seem impossible but if you persevere and don’t stop even when odds are against you, you may just surprise yourself and achieve the so-called impossible, if not how would the world have advanced? – Zoe P.

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All the Crooked Saints

Maggie Stiefvater

Here is a thing everyone wants: A miracle.
Here is a thing everyone fears: What it takes to get one.

Any visitor to Bicho Raro, Colorado is likely to find a landscape of dark saints, forbidden love, scientific dreams, miracle-mad owls, estranged affections, one or two orphans, and a sky full of watchful desert stars.

At the heart of this place you will find the Soria family, who all have the ability to perform unusual miracles. And at the heart of this family are three cousins longing to change its future: Beatriz, the girl without feelings, who wants only to be free to examine her thoughts; Daniel, the Saint of Bicho Raro, who performs miracles for everyone but himself; and Joaquin, who spends his nights running a renegade radio station under the name Diablo Diablo.

They are all looking for a miracle. But the miracles of Bicho Raro are never quite what you expect.

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